Frequently asked questions of the Fae

(and other tid-bits)

  1. How does one summon faeries... ?
  2. Where can I find faeries... ?
  3. Why don't people see faeries ... ?
  4. Who is able to see faeries... ?
  5. What are faeries ... ?
  6. When is the best time to summon faeries... ?
  7. Are there types of plants or flowers that are associated with faeries?
  8. Poetry

How does one summon faeries ... ?

It is said that to summon faeries, one must follow the instructions of  "The Fairy Call"

The Fairy Call

    A spell for summoning the fairies

            Sit where the cat sits. Cross your toes.

            Close your eyes. And smell a rose.

            Then say under your breath:

            "I believe in fairies, sure as death.

    Gadflykins! Gladtrypins!

            Gutterpuss and Cass!

            Come to me fairily

            Each lad and lass!"

 

- OR - Check out   -How to meet a Faerie-

 

~How To Meet A Faerie~


Don't take this lightly.  The fey folk are wild, their integrity so strong and unusual that you must be VERY careful with them.  However, if you approach one correctly, he/she might be an honourable, powerful and delightful friend and ally.  Such as mine....BE CAREFUL!!!!

If you find you cannot handle the power of this rite, courteously end your visit. If a bad entity arrives by accident, END THE VISIT, either with courtesy or rudeness, whichever is safest and most effective.

Do each numbered step before going to the next.


1.    Focus on the darkness of the mind's eye, the darkness that's already there when you shut your eye's.

2.    See that darkness filled with a glowing green, a Faerie green, a magick glow.

3.    Feel that magick green, Fey glow start swirling around you, bathing you in it's beauty bathing you in it's magick.

4.    Enjoy drinking in that magick for a minute.

5.    Let that Fey power feed you, cleanse you, and give you things you need. Let it work it's magick on you.

6.    Into that green thirst, call out for a Faerie friend. Don't demand a visit, we do not control the Fey Folk. Invite with warmth, courtesy, good will and good cheer.

7.    Welcome your visitor with dignity and respect. Ask his/her name and his/her need of you. If no name is given, usually you should end the visit. When you meet someone and they don't tell you their name, you usually notice something is not right huh?

8.    Never make an agreement with a Faerie. They take commitments seriously. And are tricksters, who often have an unusual view to what life should be like. You may not want the same goals as they.

9.    Visit. Then do the following steps: If you fall asleep, your visit might be happening on an unconscious level, so you would still need the following steps upon awakening.

10.    If you may, you can ask your visitor for something you need.

11.    Give your thanks for the visit, and for any help you were given. At this point it may be appropriate to give or promise a gift, (a little food & drink) left out at night.

12.    Perhaps this Faerie will become your friend for a while or even a lifetime. You can use this ritual to visit again. But for now just say "Goodbye"

13.    After doing something like this ritual, one might be in an altered state without realizing it. If you are then do something like drive or a walk at night along bright lights or cook, you could possibly go through a red light, get mugged ,or burn yourself, all because you were off in another world! So, after you finish step 12 do the following two steps:
A)  Spend time consciously focusing on the embodied, mundane plane by making your mind concentrate on physical things.

B)  Continue focusing on looking both ways when crossing streets paying special conscientious attention to kitchen safety or whatever focus is best for the activity in which you become involved. Use these two steps until you are well focused onto the embodied plane.


You may feel very sharp and alert, so think there is no need for step 13 Please do it anyway. For one thing, alert as you are, you might alert only to the Faerie plane! Take time to become alert to the physical realm. If you're feeling really spacey or "OUT THERE" add body stretches or do some other very physical "BUT SAFE" activity that will focus you onto your own body.


  All the credit goes to Francesca Dubie on How to meet a faerie.

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Where can I find faeries... ?

Faeries disguise themselves as Toads...  If you've ever noticed when a Toad is about it looks up at you in wonder...  In a different way from other critters... It might even follow you....Watch carefully next time you see a toad it may be a Faerie in disguise.

Faeries can often be found near thorn bushes, in the forest or anyplace where flowers are blooming out of season.

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Why don't people see faeries ... ?

Many people won't see faeries because they do not have any belief in them.  Only those mystical in mind, body and spirit will allow themselves to be guided to Faerieland.

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Who is able to see faeries ... ?

Anyone who believes.  Children mostly, though.

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What are faeries ... ?

Faeries are bursts of energy and light that twinkle in our mind's eye.

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When is the best time to summon faeries... ?

Anytime that you feel you are ready to meet them.  It comes without saying that the quest of meeting faeries is joined by its share of danger.  Keep your wits about you.

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Are there types of plants or flowers that are associated with faeries ?

Apple      To ensure good harvests, leave the last apple of your crop for the Apple-Tree-Man.

Ash     Druids wands were made of ash twigs. It also has healing properties. Weak-limbed children were passed through split ash trees which were then bound up. If the tree grew straight, the child would as well.

Bluebell       One who hears a bluebell ring will soon die. A field of bluebells is especially dangerous, as it is intricately interwoven with Faerie enchantments.

Clover       A four-leafed one may be used to break a Faerie spell.

Cowslips      These are loved and protected by the Faeries. They help one to find hidden Faerie gold.

Elder      Sometimes is a witch disguised as a tree. Never lay a baby in an elder wood cradle or the Faeries will pinch them so they bruise. Burning elder wood is dangerous since it invites the Devil.

Fairy Ring Shrooms      Marks the boundaries of Faerie rings.

Foxglove     Flowers are worn by Faeries as hats and gloves.

Hazel       Celtic legend says it is the receptacle of knowledge; the hazelnut is a symbol of fertility in England.

Oak     One should never take food offered by them.  It's poisonous.

Pansies       The flower that was used as a love potion by Oberon {a faerie king}.

Primroses      Eating them lets you see Faeries. If one touches a Faerie rock with the correct number of primroses in a posy, the way to faerie land and Faerie gifts is made clear. The wrong number means doom.

Ragwort      Used as makeshift horses by the Faerie.

Rowan      Protects against bad spirits. Used in butter churns so that the butter would not be overlooked by Faeries.  Druids used rowan wood for fires with which they called up spirits whom could be forced to answer questions when rowanberries were spread over the flayed hides of bulls.

St. John's Wort      A calming effect, used when stress is overwhelming. Helps break spells.

Toadstools      Some have poisonous hallucinogenic properties. The Vikings ate it and gained their reputations as berserkers. In Celtic lore, they are among the food of the gods, as with many red plants. Some toadstools associated with the Faerie are Fly Agaric, Yellow Fairy Club, Slender Elf Cap, Dune Pixie-Hood, and Dryad's Saddle.

Wild Thyme      Part of a recipe for a brew to make one see the Faeries. The tops of the Wild Thyme must be gathered near the side of a Faerie hill.

Willow      At night they uproot themselves and stalk travelers, muttering at them.



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Poetry

~The Faerie Qveene~


Me thought I saw the grave where she lay 

Within that Temple, where the vestal flame 

Was won't to burne, and passing by that way. 

To see that buried dust of living fame, 

Whose tomb faire love, and fairer vertue kept,

 All suddenly I saw the Faerie Qveene:

 At whose approach the soul of Petrarke wept, 

And from thenceforth those graces were not seen.

 For they this Qveene attended, in whose steed 

Obliuion laid him down on her herse: 

Here at the hardest stones were seen to bleed, 

And groans of buried ghosts the heruens did perse.

 Where he spright did tremble all for grief. 

And curst th'accesse of that celestial thief.


By: Edmund Spenser

 


 

~The Faerie Lover~


It is by yonder thorn that I saw the faerie host 

{O'low night wind, O'wind of the west} 

My love rode by, there was gold upon his brow, 

And since that day I neither eat nor rest.

 


I dare not pray lest I should forget his face 

{O'black north wind blowing cold beneath the sky!} 

His face and his eyes shine between me and the sun: 

If I may not be with him I would rather die.

 


They tell me I am cursed and I will lose my soul, 

{O'red wind shrieking o're the thorn-grown dun!} 

But he is my love and I go to him to-night, 

Who rides when the thorn glistens white beneath the moon.

 


He will call my name and lift me near his breast, 

{Blow soft O wind 'neath the stars of the south}

I care not for heaven and I fear not hell 

If I have but the kisses of his proud red mouth.


Moireen Fox

 



When the first baby laughed for the first time,
the laugh broke into a thousand pieces
and they all went skipping about,
and that was the beginning of fairies.


~Sir James M. Barrie, Peter Pan

 

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Rainfae-anna & Cometfae-nani
Copyright 1999  [Glistening Pixie]. All rights reserved.
Revised: November 20, 2000 .